Alzheimer’s Disease – Related Dementia (ADRD) | Care Transitions Best Practices

Alzheimer’s Disease – Related Dementia (ADRD) | Care Transitions Best Practices

Alzheimer’s Disease – Related Dementia (ADRD) | Care Transitions Best Practices

Alzheimer's Disease - Related Dementia (ADRD) | Care Transitions Best Practices

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Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Dementia, or ADRD, is defined by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HSS) as a debilitating disease that affects the memory, thought process and the daily functioning primarily of older adults. The disease is progressive, and research has yet to find a way to halt or reverse the progression of the disease. This population of patients requires special attention not only because as patients we are sicker with more health problems but treating a patient with dementia takes a special skill set and understanding of disease process. The health care professional must understand first the disease of Alzheimer’s and Dementia and understand how to manage the commodities and how exacerbation of commodities may affect their mentation. We must learn a specialized diligence in assessment of mentation and managing acute changes. Health care providers must remain up to date on current best practices in Alzheimer’s and dementia care in different healthcare settings and how to manage the consequences as the ADRD patient moves through different settings.

COURSE INFORMATION

1 hrsValid for 12 monthsCreated 2019-09-13Updated 2019-09-13

Course Objectives

  • Describe the effects a transition in care can have on a person diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.
  • Understand the prevalence of ADRD in different care settings
  • Utilized evidence-based guidelines to assist with the transition of care for a person diagnosed with ADRD.

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